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ADAS SAFETY FEATURES

ADAS

Here Are Some ADAS Safety Features and Their Benefits:

LDWS (Lane Departure Warning System) alerts drivers when they are about to drift out of their lane. This can be helpful for preventing accidents caused by driver distraction or drowsiness. LDWS systems typically use cameras or radar sensors to detect lane markings, and they warn drivers with visual or audible alerts.

The camera-based ADAS system does not work in heavy rain or fog because it needs to see the lane markings to function properly. The rain and fog can obscure the lane markings, making it difficult for the camera to detect them. As a result, the ADAS system may not be able to warn the driver about lane departure or other hazards.

LKA (Lane Keep Assistance) takes lane departure warning a step further by automatically steering the vehicle back into its lane if it begins to drift. This can be helpful for drivers who have difficulty staying in their lane. LKA systems typically use cameras or radar sensors to detect lane markings, and they steer the vehicle back into its lane by taking control of the power steering.

FCA (Forward Collision Alert) alerts drivers when they are about to collide with another vehicle or object. This can be helpful for preventing accidents caused by driver inattention or misjudgment. FCA systems typically use radar sensors to detect other vehicles and objects, and they warn drivers with visual or audible alerts. In some cases, FCA systems may also automatically brake the vehicle to help prevent a collision.

FCA systems use radar, cameras, or a combination of both to detect vehicles and other objects in front of the car. Some radar sensors are typically located on the front bumper. It is crucial to keep the bumper clean and free of debris, collision damage, and other obstructions to ensure that the sensors function properly.

Forward Collision Alert (FCA) is also known by other names, such as Forward Collision Warning, Forward Collision Avoidance, Pre-Collision System, Smart City Brake, and Collision Mitigating Braking.

ACC  (Adaptive Cruise Control) maintains a set speed and distance between the vehicle and the vehicle ahead. This can be helpful for reducing driver fatigue and preventing rear-end collisions. ACC systems typically use radar sensors to detect the vehicle ahead, and they adjust the vehicle's speed and throttle accordingly.

AHL (Adaptive Head Lighting) automatically adjusts the headlights to provide optimal visibility in different driving conditions. This can be helpful for improving visibility at night, in fog, and in other low-light conditions. AHL systems typically use cameras or light sensors to detect the surrounding environment, and they adjust the headlights accordingly.

TSR (Traffic Sign Recognition) identifies and interprets traffic signs, and it can alert drivers to changes in speed limits, upcoming turns, and other important traffic information. This can be helpful for preventing accidents caused by driver inattention or misjudgment. TSR systems typically use cameras to detect traffic signs, and they interpret the signs using artificial intelligence or machine learning algorithms.

 

PD (Pedestrian Detection) detects pedestrians in the vehicle's path, and it can alert drivers to the presence of pedestrians or automatically brake the vehicle to help prevent a collision. This can be helpful for preventing accidents caused by driver inattention or misjudgment. PD systems typically use cameras or radar sensors to detect pedestrians, and they alert drivers with visual or audible alerts. In some cases, PD systems may also automatically brake the vehicle to help prevent a collision.

Pedestrian Avoidance is another term referring to Pedestrian Detection.

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